The Orders of Striped Tiger – Nine Classes (2009-09-21)

Figure 1: First Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 2: Second Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 3: Third Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 4: Forth Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 5: Fifth Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 6: Sixth Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 7: Seventh Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 8: Eighth Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 9: Ninth Class (Click on image to enlarge.)

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Qing Dynasty Orders – 25 Pictures (2009-08-17)

Figure 1: The Order of Double Dragon Type 2, first class third grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 2 & 3: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, first class third grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 4  & 5: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, second class first grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 6 & 7: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, second class  second grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 8 & 9: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, second class third grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figure 10 & 11 The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, second class second grade, transitional design (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 12 & 13: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, third class first grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 14 to 16: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, third class second grade (click images to enlarge.)

https://i1.wp.com/farm3.static.flickr.com/2611/3830313983_f2701d9ef5_o.jpg

Figures 17 to 20: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, third class third grade (click images to enlarge.)

Figures 21 to 25: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, fourth class (click images to enlarge.)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2538/3831109710_faeb331cd2_o.jpgThe Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, first class third gradeFigure 1 & 2: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, first class third grade.

Figure 1 & 2: The Order of the Double Dragon Type 2, first class third grade.http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2596/3829676171_313d671cab_o.jpg

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Classification of the Qing Dynasty Double Dragon Orders (2009-08-13)

The issuance of the Qing Dynasty Double Dragon Orders likely began on March 11th, 1861, following the establishment of the foreign ministry, and required the approval from the Emperor. The evolvement of the Double Dragon Orders is divided in three periods: the early version of the Double Dragon Order awarded between 1862 and 1881; the first type of the Double Dragon Orders awarded between 1881 and 1896; and the second type of the Double Dragon Orders awarded between 1896 and 1911.

The early version of the Double Dragon Orders awarded between 1862 and 1881 are now extremely rare and are with very limited documentations. Based on the engravings, the early version orders are within the first three classes (Figure 1). Those with the same format but without engravings are speculated to belong to the fourth and fifth classes (Figure 2). The classification of the early version Double Dragon Orders is different from those issued in the later periods (the later ones have their classes engraved in Manchurian). However, the early version orders are embedded with gemstones of three different colors – red, blue, and white – which likely represent the first, second, and third class respectively. The use of gemstone color for the purpose of classification has been seen in the insignia of the late Qing Dynasty’s modernized military.

Figure 1: The early type Double Dragon Order, second class, second grade, gold medal (Click image to enlarge.)

Figure 2: The early type Double Dragon Order, third grade, silver medal (Click on image to enlarge.)

There were specific requirements and blueprints for the appearance and classification of the first type Double Dragon Orders awarded between 1881 and 1896. The differences in shape between the first, second and third class orders are displayed in Figure 3. However, the grade differentiation is based on each specific class. Figure 4 illustrates various grades among the first class orders as issued by foreign ministry. From the blueprint and from actual orders, the differences between various grades of the first class medal can be easily differentiated: 1) the first difference is in the position and the number of flame; 2) the second difference is in the indication of grades written in Manchurian (the same Manchurian writings also apply to second and third classes). Figure 5 illustrates the blueprint for various grades of the second class orders. From the blueprint, one could easily differentiate the grades by looking at: 1) the difference in the design of the cloud-shaped edges; 2) the difference in the last right Manchurian word indicating the grade of the order. Figure 6 illustrates the blueprint for various grades of third class orders. The same method of classification of the second class orders can be applied to classify the third class orders. The fourth and fifth classes Double Dragon Orders are not further classified into specific grades (Figure 7).

Figure 3 (left): Double Dragon Order of the first type, first class, third grade, in gold (Large size) (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 3 (middle): Dragon Order of the first type, second class, third grade, in silver (Large size) (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 3 (right): Double Dragon Order of the first type, third class, first grade, in gold (Large size) (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 4 (Click on images to enlarge).

Figure 5 (Click on images to enlarge).

Figure 6 (Click on images to enlarge).

Figure 7 (Click on images to enlarge).

There were also specific requirements and blueprints for the appearance and classification of the second type Double Dragon Orders awarded between 1896 and 1911. The unique design of the first class first grade order can be easily recognized by the presence of coiled dragon on the order and sash badge. The unique design of the first class second grade order is the line of embedded pearls surrounding the coral in the centre (Figure 8). The unique design of the first class third grade order is the small pearls embedded in each cloud (Figure 9). The sash badges of the second and third grades are the same in the sense that they both have a six-petal flower design (Figure 10). Figure 11 illustrates the various grades of the second type second class orders. Figure 12 illustrates the sash badges of the second type second class orders. The main point in distinguishing the various grades of the second class orders is to observe the decorative design patterns surrounding the coral in the centre of the orders. Usually the first grade has a five-petal flower design pattern surrounding the coral in the centre. The second grade has a T-shaped pattern, whereas the third grade has a m-shaped pattern. The sash badges of the first grade and second grade are similar in the sense that they both have the same blue flower pattern on the outside, whereas the third grade has a unique blue wedge pattern on the outside. Figure 13 illustrates the second type third class orders, which do not come with sash badges. Other than the blue gemstone in the centre, various grades of the third class orders can be distinguished in the same way as the second class orders. Figure 14 illustrates the second type fourth and fifth classes. These can be easily distinguished based on their unique shapes.

Of course, there are many other special double dragon order designs that were custom made for specific occasions. These special designs are not discussed in this article for the time being.

Figure 8: The second type Double Dragon Order, first class, second grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 9: The second type Double Dragon Order, first class, third grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 10: The second type Double Dragon Order, first class, third grade sash badge (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 11 (left): The second type Double Dragon Order, second class, first grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 11 (middle): The second type Double Dragon Order, second class, second grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 11 (right): The second type Double Dragon Order, second class, second grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 12 (left): The second type Double Dragon Order, second class, first grade sash badge (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 12 (middle): The second type Double Dragon Order, second class, second grade sash badge (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 12 (right): The second type Double Dragon Order, second class, second grade sash badge (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 13 (left): The second type Double Dragon Order, third class, first grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 13 (middle): The second type Double Dragon Order, third class, second grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 13 (right): The second type Double Dragon Order, third class, second grade (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 14: The second type Double Dragon Order, fourth class (Click on image to enlarge.)

Figure 15: The second type Double Dragon Order, fifth class (Click on image to enlarge.)

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Double Dragon Order of the Late Qing Dynasty (2009-08-12)

The Double Dragon Order is the first official government medal implemented in China. The first ever documented order was the Order of the Double Dragon second class first grade, early type in gold (Figures 1, 2). It was awarded to a Briton named James Bevan Edwards (Figure 3) in 1864 during the Tongzhi period.

Figures 1 to 3: The Double Dragon Order (in gold) awarded to James Bevan Edwards (Click on images to enlarge.)

In 1864, James Bevan Edwards joined the regiment under Colonel Gordon’s command and participated in the battle against the Taiping Rebels in Changzhou. He was awarded the Order of the Double Dragon second class first grade for his exceptional service. These earliest version of the Double Dragon Order is categorized into three classes, each class embedded with a different colour gemstones (red, blue, white), which are speculated for distinguishing the three classes. There are other orders with a similar format but the classes are not engraved and specified. These other orders are believed to be of lower grade. Further investigation into the Qing dynasty archives is needed to verify the categorization of these early versions of the second class order.

The first documented version of the Double Dragon Order regulations was released by the Qing government’s foreign ministry on December 19th, 1881. These regulations specified the detailed requirements for the Double Dragon Order, such as name, classification, appearance, licence, production, and agenda of the awarding ceremony. These orders are commonly known as the first type Double Dragon Orders (Figures 4 to 6).

Figures 4 to 6: First type Double Dragon Orders (Click on images to enlarge.)

During that era, the Double Dragon Orders were only awarded to foreigners. And when Qing government officials visited western country, they would have many different versions of the Double Dragon Order custom made. The countries that are known to have produced the Double Dragon Order include Russia, Germany, Austria, Belgium and France (Figures 7 to 10).

Figures 7 to 10: Double Dragon Orders custom made in western countries (Click on images to enlarge.)

On February 11th, 1897, the Qing government’s foreign ministry granted to change the Double Dragon Order into a star shape, and to no longer embroider a dragon shape on the sash. The ministry then released the revised regulations regarding these changes. The Double Dragon Orders made since then are commonly known as the second type Double Dragon Orders (Figures 11, 12). At this time, Qing government officials would still have most of the orders custom made in western countries (Figures 13 to 16).

Figures 11 & 12: Second type Double Dragon Orders (Click on images to enlarge.)

Figures 13 to 16:Second type Double Dragon Orders custom made in western countries (Click on images to enlarge.)

Until August 1908, the early versions of the Double Dragon Orders were only awarded to foreigners. At the request of the foreign ministry, the Qing government began awarding the orders to government officials who were on official visits to foreign countries.

It can be said that the Double Dragon Orders are China’s milestone in opening itself to foreign countries, in building the country’s dignity, and in reaching out to the rest of the world. Therefore, to this date, they are still deeply valued by Chinese and foreign medal collectors.

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An Overview of the Chinese Expositions during the Late Qing Dynasty – An Article Celebrating China’s First Ever World Expo in 2010 (2009-08-11)

During the late Qing Dynasty, western countries forced the opening of China to the outside world. Hosting commercial and industrial expositions had become one of the Qing government’s modernization policies.

The first ever such exposition was organized by Zhang Zhidong (Figure 1), who was the governor of Hubei and Hunan provinces. Back in 1898, Zhang established a commerce bureau in Hankou. He displayed locally manufactured goods, along with their origins and prices, and encouraged Chinese and foreign businessmen to participate. In 1904, the Hubei and Hunan provincial bazaar was constructed. There were three departments inside. The first department displayed the manufacturing goods of Hubei. The second department displayed the manufacturing goods and machineries from other provinces and from foreign countries. The third department displayed the local products such as minerals, coal, herbal medicine, leather, etc. These local products were there to facilitate exports to other provinces and foreign countries.

Figure 1: Medal awarded to governor Zhang Zhidong (click on images to enlarge.)

On September 7th 1903, the Qing government established the ministry of commerce.  In 1905, the ministry enacted regulations which encouraged local and foreign businessmen to host expositions. In 1906, Shengjing general Zhao Erxun set up a display of commercial products in the province of Fengtian. Also in 1906, the commerce association in Tianjin founded the bazaar at the Tianhou Palace for the first ever commercial products exposition (Figure 2). In 1906, the commerce association in Guangdong hosted a display of manufacturing goods. The next year it established a bazaar. In 1908, Jiangsu’s industrial bureau hosted a display of commercial goods. In 1909, Jiangnan’s commercial bureau also set up a display of commercial goods. In 1910, Jiangnan’s commercial bureau hosted the Chancellor of Nanyang Products Exposition which displayed products from the southern provinces (Figure 3). In 1909, an exposition was hosted in Shanghai which displayed the products from seven prefectures in the Songjiang district. This should be the first ever exposition in Shanghai (Figure 4).

Figure 2: Medal for the Tianjin exposition in 1906 (Click on images to enlarge.)

Figure 3: Medal for the Chancellor of Nanyang Products Exposition (Click on images to enlarge)

Figure 4: Medal for the Songjiang products exposition hosted in Shanghai (Click on images to enlarge.)

It is worth mentioning that from 1906 to 1911, the province of Sichuan hosted six commercial expositions in Chengdu (Figure 5). The first three focused on manufacturing industry. The last three was broadened to cover the agriculture industry, the manufacturing industry, and the commercial industry. There were eight display categories: 1) machineries, 2) hand made goods, 3) government made goods, 4) educational products, 5) agricultural products, 6) animal related products, 7) plant related products, 8 ) natural products. There were more than a thousand types of products at each of these expositions. In order to encourage participations, awards were given to the participants. Four awards were given at each exposition: 1) the first class medal was the Red Peony Gold Medal. It was presented to participants who displayed machineries that could rival those from the western countries. 2) the second class medal was named the Lotus Silver Medal, which was presented to participants who displayed products that were not available in the Sichuan province; 3) the third class medal was named the Cherry Apple Silver Medal, which was presented to participants who had made improvements to Sichuan products; 4) the fourth class medal was named the Plum Blossom Bronze Medal, which was presented to participants who displayed innovative commodities.

Figure 5: Medal for the Sichuan commercial expositions hosted in Chengdu (Click on images to enlarge.)

In September, 1909, Chen Kuilong succeeded to the position as the governor of Hunan and Hubei provinces, and set up exposition at the warehouses outside Wuchang’s Wenchang Gate and Pinghu Gate (Figure 6). The exposition lasted forty five days. The main display houses were sorted into categories such as natural products, industrial crafts, arts, educational materials, and antiques with a total of six thousand types of displayed items. Furthermore, the exposition also included seven special display houses and sixteen extra special display rooms with more than fourteen hundred items. The special display houses were the Zhili House, Hunan House, Shanghai House, Ningbo House, House of Hanyang Steel Factory, House of Hanyang Military Factory, and House of Hanyang Training Factory. Overall, there were over a thousand participants with more than eight thousand types of displayed items.  In China, this was the first ever large exposition with participants from different regions across the country.

Figure 6: Medal for the exposition hosted in Wuchang in 1909 (Click on images to enlarge.)

The Nanyang Exposition was the largest national commercial exposition during the late Qing period (Figures 7 & 8). Duan Fang, who was the governor of Jiangsu and Jiangxi, requested to host the first ever exposition in Nanking in December, 1908. In May, 1909, Duan Fang moved to the new posts as the governor of Zhili and the chancellor of Peiyang.  Zhang Renjun, who was the governor of Guangdong and Guangxi, assumed Duan’s position. On July 13th, the Qing government approved Duan’s request, and assigned Zhang as the chair of the exposition. Due to the massive scale of the exposition, a new government agency was established to make preparations. The government decided to host the exposition with business and industry. The initial budget was five hundred thousand silver taels, and was shared between the Jiangsu government and Jiangsu’s businesses and industries. The budget was later increased to one million silver taels. Since 1873, the Governor of Jiangsu and Jiangxi also held the position as the chancellor of Nanyang. Because of this reason, the exposition was named the Nanyang Exposition.  The Nanyang Exposition opened on June 5th , 1910 in Nanking. The main sites, which occupied an area of over 140 hectares, were located in the regions of Dingjiaqiao and Sanpailou.  There were display houses for a number of provinces, which were Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, Zhili, Shangxi, Shanxi, Hubei, Hunan, Sichuan, Henan, Yunnan, Guizhou, Shandong, Zhejiang, Fujian, etc. As the host, Jiangsu and Jianxi had the largest displayed houses. Display categories were industrial crafts, agriculture, machineries, transportation, education, health, arts, and weaponries. There were also specialized display houses for Hunan’s china industry, Boshan’s glass industry, Nanking’s textile industry, Shanghai’s industrial bureau, Guangdong’s educational products industry, Zhejiang’s fishery industry, oversea Chinese businesses, and foreign products. Display items were mostly from light industry, agricultural by-product industry, arts and crafts industry. Directed by chief inspector Yang Shiqi, and led by renowned Nanking scholar Li Ruiqing, more than seven hundred experts of the exposition research group evaluated the quality of the display items. From nearly one million displayed items (four hundred and forty types), they presented first class awards to sixty six items, second class awards to two hundred fourteen items, third class awards to four hundred twenty eight items, forth class awards to twelve hundred eighteen items, fifth class awards to three thousand three hundred forty five items (a grand total of five thousand two hundred seventy one awards.) The Nanking Exposition drew extensive attention from people throughout the Chinese society, and attracted many high profile merchants, scholars, and government officials to attend. Also attended were the large delegations from Japan, United States, and Chinese residents from Southeast Asia. The Nanking Exposition lasted six months, and came to an end on November 29th, 1910. Over three hundred thousand people visited. Trades during the exposition were worth tens of millions of dollars. At that time, people considered the Nanking Exposition as a grand event in five thousand years of Chinese history.

Figures 7 & 8: Medals for the 1910 Nanyang Exposition (Click on images to enlarge.)

Although China was a very weak country during the late Qing dynasty, it had already written its history in hosting expositions. China is now becoming one of the world’s economic powerhouses. With its strength and resources, we believe China will host a very successful 2010 World Expo in Shanghai.

In 1906, the commerce association in Guangdong hosted a display of manufacturing goods. The next year it established a bazaar. In 1908, Jiangsu’s industrial bureau hosted a display of commercial goods. In 1909, Jiangnan’s commercial bureau also set up a display of commercial goods. In 1910, Jiangnan’s commercial bureau hosted the Chancellor of Nanyang Products Exposition which displayed products from the southern provinces (Figure 3).

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Chinese Orders – 12 Pictures (2009-07-08)

Qing Dynasty Orders (Click on images to enlarge):

Peiyang Government Orders (Click on images to enlarge):

Nanking Government Orders (Click on images to enlarge):

Manchukuo Orders (Click on image to enlarge):

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